Topic: “weather”

Spring forest after rain

…and as the drenching downpour faded into barely-more-than mist, the clouds began to let shine through a springtime sun—and though still gray the sky (if mottled, now and then, with blue), the leavèd trees all round flamed brighter in their verdancy than any I have ever seen…


The first line would be set on the ragged right edge of the text to mark its rhythmic position, were that possible.

restless

I have always been restless, he said to me, as we sat there on the curb, watching traffic flow into the fading light of a late spring afternoon. And yes, it is submerged sometimes, buried under a layer of work and family and responsibility, but always my heart yearns for something different, bigger, something that would satisfy my soul, and I do not think it exists – at least, not here. Read on, intrepid explorer →

You know how terrific a really big thunderstorm can be down in the land and in a river-valley; especially at times when two great thunderstorms meet and clash. More terrible still are thunder and lightning in the mountains at night, when storms come up from East and West and make war. The lightning splinters on the peaks, and rocks shiver, and great crashes split the air and go rolling and tumbling into every cave and hollow; and the darkness is filled with overwhelming noise and sudden light.

—J. R. R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

The rain never stopped.

Sometimes it was no more than a chill mist sitting on the air; other times it came down suddenly, like an angry fist, and the Coop shuddered against it. The sky stood iron above. And the weird wind was ever out of the east.

The trees lost their leaves, but there was no beauty in it this year, not any color but rot. It was as if they had simply given up to the moisture and the cold, and forgotten life. Nor was there any crackling of dry leaves, nor the sharp scent—clean and musty—of falling leaves, nor the blue bit of the year going out. Damp foliage was stripped from the trees by an everlasting rain. The naked trees shivered. That was all.

—Walter Wangerin Jr., The Book of the Dun Cow, p. 63

The raining never stopped. From horizon to horizon, the clouds were locked in place, and the earth was shut up. An east wind—an odd wind to command the weather—brought this wetness and never stopped bringing it.

But perhaps God looked down from his heaven and had pity upon the Coop, for a merciful change occurred in the rain. It became snow. And where water as rain was mere misery, the same water as snow was a soft delight: A hard freeze made the ground bony and firm; snow followed to whiten and to reveal the gentle contour of that ground; the cold air snapped life into the creatures who ventured forth to walk on it; the forest greeted them, tinkling and clinking as if its great trees had tiny voices—and more than any of that, the Coop became muffled in its warmth, because snow drifted up the outside of its walls.

—ibid., p. 70

Drive Poem

6:38am We crest a hill and the plain before Spreads vast and white 6:48am The land to either side is wrapped in Glorious shroud of purest heaven fall Read on, intrepid explorer →